Category Archives: Reviews

Review: Hard cOrchesis

Went to the Sister’s dance show last night, “Hard cOrchesis” at Columbia University.

Wow–just wow. The show was amazing!

It was hard to decide, which was more impressive, the footwork displayed by the dancers (just watching the feet) or the overall movement and costumes.

The best dance hands down was the African Dance number choreographed by The Sister. (A biased opinion? Okay, well perhaps). The movement of the dancers and the spirit it contained plus the impressive drummer–wow!

The Sister says that there is a video recording being made of the performance–so expect some clips to appear on You Tube sometime in the near future. (Links will naturally be forthcoming).

Seeking Da Vinci Code Reviews

I’m finding it difficult to find a review of the Da Vinci Code on it’s merits as a film, rather than one which decides to focus on all the controversy surrounding the film.

When I reda the book (about 2 ears ago), I was skeptical/confused about a lot of the sthings people are now complaining about. In all, I just saw the book as a work of fiction. Nothing more, nothing less. I enjoyed reading the book (though I really should re-read it).

So I’m curious to hear about the film itself. I’ve heard that it’s long (2.5h) but does the plot hold up? Is there the same excitement and sense of mystery in the film that there was in the book? Does it hold your attention?

I’ve not seen very many reviews which touch on these kinds of topics–but I’m anxious to hear what people thought of the film itself.

Code Name Bayonet

Just got back from a screening of Code Name Bayonet at the JCC here in Manhattan (hence my lack of posting this evening)

It’s a docuumentary on the events that followed the 1972 Munich massacre, with on site footage and interview with parties involved.

I highly recomment the film–which seems very similar to the book “Striking Back”

Recent Reads

Just finished reading: Into the Red Zone by Steven Vincent (the book’s blog is here)

A great read to say the least. Vincent tells (told?) his story of first hand experiences from his trips in and around Iraq as a freelance journalist. As an individual who seems to be versed in Arab culture and society. He approaches the subject of life in Iraq with an understanding of some of the dynamics of Arab society–but through his experiences his knowledge grows and he imparts more and more of it to the reader.

Vincent’s book also discusses the pros and cons of Iraqi society at time. The mistaken expectations of both the Administration and the Iraqi people and the difference in societal norms between cultures that indicates the challenges that we faced and continue to face.

A very good read in my opinion

Book in progress review: FDR’s folly

I’m currently reading “FDR’s Folly How Roosevelt and His New Deal Prolonged the Great Depression” by Jim Powell.

I’m about half-way through the book, and it seems like a rather damning accusation against FDR’s New Deal policies. However, there is the caveat that only one side of the argument is really being presented.

Back in high school, in AP US History class (in retrospect one of the best classes I ever had) I remember learning that it wasn’t as much the New Deal as it was WWII that brought the US out of the Depression. So I’ve had that in mind as I read the book.

Speaking as someone who isn’t well versed in economics (areas such as inflation/deflation, currency valiues), I often have to take the author’s word for things in terms of arguments, which in my eyes somewhat weakens them.

Another thing I’m waiting for (and perhaps it comes later in the book) are the authors suggestions of what he would have done were he in charge to pull the nation’s economy out of the depression. Simply saying that he’d do the opposite of FDR’s policies isn’t going to satisfy me. I’m looking for something a bit more substantial.

Book review: Nothing’s Sacred

Just finished “Nothing’s Sacred” by Lewis Black

It was a very, very funny read, which I enjoyed throughly.

The only improvement I could think of on the book may be to hear Black deliver the dext himself–either as an audio book or as a collection of standup routines. As I read the short little “chapters” I tried to imagine Black’s voice delivering the text–which made it all the funnier.

The current book in progress: This entry was posted in Reviews on by .

Book review: Nothing’s Sacred

Just finished “Nothing’s Sacred” by Lewis Black

It was a very, very funny read, which I enjoyed throughly.

The only improvement I could think of on the book may be to hear Black deliver the dext himself–either as an audio book or as a collection of standup routines. As I read the short little “chapters” I tried to imagine Black’s voice delivering the text–which made it all the funnier.

The current book in progress: FDR’s Folly and QuickBooks 2004 for Dummies (work related reading)

Beverage Appreciation

Jay has a post up about how he’s starting to become a minor oenophile

In a similar vein, I’ve become a coffee taster, after having so many different brews from around the city. (I’m proud to say however, that I’ve yet to patronize the $tarbuck$ across the street from my building.)

None the less, here’s something I’ve wondered about. What’s the term for a coffee afficionado?

An analogy:

Wine: Oenophile as Coffee: ?

Quick Review: Munich

I saw Munich last night at a local theater amid an interesting crowd–one with many Israelis in it too
(I could tell by the number of Hebrew speakers I heard).

My opinion of the film basically mirrors those of Captain Ed and Steve Silver

The film itself is very well made, and is worthy of praise. However, it is Spielberg’s attempts at moral relativism and his quest to solve the problems in the Middle East which really bring this film down.

As someone well versed in Israeli History, I also didn’t like how Speilberg played fast and loose with what really happened in the aftermath of Munich IT’s important to remember that the film was only inspired by the events, not a full retelling of the events.

In all, there were snickers from the audience at different points in the film. A lot of laughter at some of the humorous lines, especially about the recipts.

In all–is it worth seeing in the theaters–I”m not really sure